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Today in History: May 20

Today in History: May 20
20 May
7:04

Today in history

In 1928, the city is host to from about ten to fourteen hoboes a week now in the official hotel, otherwise known as the jail. The men come and apply for a night’s lodging and a “bell boy” assigns them to a bunk. Fourteen were guests of the city in the hoosegow last week. They are hobos, however, and not tramps. The distinction is that tramps make counting the railroad ties a life work and profession. Hoboes will work if they can find something to do.

On this day

In 1521, Ignatius of Loyola was wounded by a cannonball while defending Pamplona against the French; during his convalescence he turned to religion, becoming a leader of the Counter-Reformation and the founder of the Jesuits.

In 1712, the original version of Alexander Pope’s satirical mock-heroic poem “The Rape of the Lock” was published anonymously in Lintot’s Miscellany.

In 1873, Levi Strauss and tailor Jacob Davis received a U.S. patent for men’s work pants made with copper rivets.

In 1899, taxi driver Jacob German was pulled over and arrested by a police officer riding a bicycle for speeding down Manhattan’s Lexington Avenue in his electric car at 12 miles an hour at a time when the speed limit was 8 mph; it was the first recorded speeding arrest in U.S. history.

In 1927, Charles Lindbergh took off from Roosevelt Field in Long Island, New York, aboard the Spirit of St. Louis on his historic solo flight to France.

In 1932, Amelia Earhart took off from Newfoundland to become the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic. (Because of weather and equipment problems, Earhart set down in Northern Ireland instead of her intended destination, France.)

In 1948, Chiang Kai-shek was inaugurated as the first president of the Republic of China (Taiwan).

In 1959, nearly 5,000 Japanese-Americans had their U.S. citizenships restored after choosing to renounce them during World War II.

In 1961, a white mob attacked a busload of Freedom Riders in Montgomery, Alabama, prompting the federal government to send in U.S. marshals to restore order.

In 1978, Japan’s Narita International Airport began operations after years of protests over its construction by local residents.

In 1988, a 30-year-old woman walked into a Winnetka, Illinois, elementary school classroom, where she shot to death 8-year-old Nicholas Corwin and wounded several other children. After wounding a young man at his home, the shooter took her own life.

In 1993, an estimated 93 million people tuned in for the final first-run episode of the sitcom “Cheers” on NBC.

In 1998, the government unveiled the design for the new $20 bill, featuring a larger and slightly off-center portrait of Andrew Jackson.

In 2008, Sen. Edward Kennedy was diagnosed with a cancerous brain tumor; some experts gave the Massachusetts Democrat less than a year to live. (Kennedy died in August 2009.)

Celebrity birthdays

Cher is 72.

Bronson Pinchot is 59.

Tony Stewart is 47.

Jon Pardi is 33.

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